Chronicles of England, France, Spain, and the Adjoining Countries: From the Latter Part of the Reign of Edward II. to the Coronation of Henry IV.

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W. Smith, 1839 - 1501 Seiten
 

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chap
45
King Robert of Scotland and his Nine
48
The Old MaisondeVille Ghent
63
Froissart at the Court of the Count
73
The king of England for the third time makes
96
chap page chap page
106
countess
110
The death of the lord Robert dArtois
120
The king of England sets at liberty sir Herve
126
The count de Lisle lieutenant for the king
132
chap pAge I chap PAGE
135
English and Gascon Lords at Bordeaux
137
Sir Walter Manny finds in La Reole the sepul
138
Jacob Van Artaveld is murdered at Ghent
145
Ambassadors of Portugal presented
150
The king of England marches into Normandy
152
The English commit great disorders in Norman
158
The battle of Crecy between the kings of France
164
Sir Walter Manny by means of a passport rides
170
The king of Scotland during the siege of Calais
173
The young earl of Flanders is betrothed through
179
The king of England guards all the passes round
185
Attack on the Fortifications of Pontevedra
190
A page of the name of Croquart turns robber
191
General View of Sluys
198
The death of king Philip and coronation of
201
The king of France arrests the king of Navarre
208
The disposition of the French before the battle
214
Two Frenchmen running away from the battle
222
Battleaxe Fight between Sir John Holland
230
View of the City of Burgos
236
The provost of the merchants of Paris kills three
239
The death of the provost of the merchants of Paris
245
Lord Beaumanoir paying the Ransom
247
The men of Picardy besiege the Navarrois in
251
Sir Peter Audley leads a party of Navarrois
257
The French refuse to ratify the treaty which
263
chap chap page
264
The king of England leaves CalaisThe order
269
Sir John Chandos does great mischief to the 291 Sir Bertrand du Guesclin is made constable
270
Richard the Second at Bristol
273
The lord of Roye and his company defeat
276
The four brothers of France have a meeting being allies of France attack him at sea
282
The form and tenor of the paper drawn up
284
The transactions of the two kings of France
290
Bayonne as it appeared in the Seventeenth
297
View of Jedburgh
362
The king of Navarre is made prisoner by
363
The battle of Navaretta which the prince
369
Death of Douglas at Otterbourne
370
All Castille after the battle of Navaretta acknow
375
After the return of the prince to Aquitaine
381
304
394
Triumphal Entry of Queen Isabella into
399
PAGE
407
Coronation of Pope Boniface
427
Tournament at St Inglevere
435
English and French Knights under
448
336
464
The duke of Berry invades Limousin 445 de Buch arrives there but too late
472
Siege of the Town of Africa
473
The siege of Becherel Peace between the kings
490
Richard the Second and his three Uncles
495
323
508
Assemblyof the French King and the Lords
517
5
520
The duke of Anjou returns to the duchess
528
Shrine of St Aquaire
538
The inhabitants of Evreux surrender to the French
547
The infant of Castille besieges Pampeluna Sir
555
Sir Thomas Trivet returns to England with
562
Geoffry TêteNoir and Aimerigot Marcel captains
568
The state of Flanders before the war The
575
Irish Chieftains making a Charge
578
The White Hoods murder the bailiff of Ghent
581
Several assaults are made on Oudenarde Peace
589
King of Hungary holding a Council with
602
Battle of Nicopoli
608
William of Hainault on his Expedition
614
Isabella and the king of England taking
620
Two additional chapters which are only in
621
thap
633
The Earl Marshal challenging the Earl
665
68
681
Earl of Derby taking leave of the King
686
Richard the Second resigning the Crown
697
90
705
Funeral Procession of Richard the Second
708
Charles the Sixth king of France from a dream
713
King Charles orders commissioners to enter into and his whole army defeated
743
Order of the French army in its march to others in the different towns and cities
754
The king of France receives information of a kirk He defeats twelve thousand Flemings
762

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Seite 166 - Genoese felt these arrows, which pierced their arms, heads, and through their armour, some of them cut the strings of their cross-bows, others flung them on the ground, and all turned about and retreated, quite discomfited. The French had a large body of men-at-arms on horseback, richly dressed, to support the Genoese. The king of France, seeing them thus fall back, cried out, "Kill me those scoundrels; for they stop up our road, without any reason.
Seite 167 - but he is in so hot an engagement that he has great need of your help." The king answered, "Now, Sir Thomas, return to those that sent you, and tell them from me not to send again for me this day, or expect that I shall come, let what will happen, as long as my son has life : and say that I command them to let the boy win his spurs ; for I am determined, if...
Seite 72 - Christopher," which led the van, was recaptured by the English, and all in her taken or killed. There were then great shouts and cries, and the English manned her again with archers, and sent her to fight against the Genoese.
Seite 164 - Genoese cross-bowmen ; but they were quite fatigued, having marched on foot that day six leagues, completely armed, and with their cross-bows. They told the constable, they were not in a fit condition to do any great things that day in battle. The earl of AJen9on, hearing this, said, " This is what one gets by employing such scoundrels, who fall off when there is any need for them.
Seite 223 - he is not here ; but surrender yourself to me, and I will lead you to him." — "Who are you?" said the king. "Sire, I am Denys de Morbeque, a knight from Artois ; but I serve the King of England, because I cannot belong to France, having forfeited all I possessed there." The king then gave him his right-hand glove, and said, "I surrender myself to you.
Seite 187 - Calais march out of the town, with bare heads and feet, with ropes round their necks, and the keys of the town and castle in their hands ; these six persons shall be at my absolute disposal, and the remainder of the inhabitants pardoned.
Seite 226 - ... he was not worthy of such an honour, nor did it appertain to him to seat himself at the table of so great a king, or of so valiant a man as he had shown himself by his actions that day.
Seite 227 - ... have this day acquired such high renown for prowess that you have surpassed all the best knights on your side. I do not, dear sir, say this to flatter you, for all those of our side who have seen and observed the actions of each party have unanimously allowed this to be your due, and decree you the prize and garland for it.
Seite 166 - Luxembourg : having heard the order of the battle, he inquired where his son, the lord Charles, was ; his attendants answered that they did not know, but believed he was fighting. The king said to them, " Gentlemen, you are all my people, my friends and brethren-at-arms this day ; therefore, as I am blind, I request of you to lead me so far into the engagement that I may strike one stroke with my sword.
Seite 166 - ... the enemy. The lord Charles of Bohemia, who already signed his name as king of Germany, and bore the arms, had come in good order to the engagement ; but when he perceived that it was likely to turn out against the French he departed, and I do not well know what road he took.

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