The Indian Races of North and South America, Comprising an Account of the Principal Aboriginal Races: A Description of Their National Customs, Mythology, and Religious Cermonies; the History of Their Most Powerful Tribes, and of Their Most Celebrated Chiefs and Warriors

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American subscription house, 1856 - 640 Seiten
 

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Seizure and Imprisonment of MontezumaExecution of Qualpopoca
87
Preparations for the Attack on the City of MexicoBuilding and Trans
96
Rëbuilding of the CityExtension of Spanish PowersThe March
106
Progress Northward_Egytests with the NativesVitachucoExpedi
116
Execution of an Indian Captive
121
From the Conquest by De Soto to tněYear 1818Missionary Opera
122
Portrait of Osceola the Celebrated Florida Chief
129
Pursuit of the Seminoles SouthwardEncounter on the Hatchee Lus
140
Expedition of Amidas and Barlowor Sir Richard GrenvilleOf
151
Portrait of Captain John Smith the Pioneer of Virginia
152
Court of PowhatanSmiths Preservation by PocahontasSupplies
160
Pocahontas Interposing for the Life of Captain John Smith
161
Coronation of PowhatanSmiths Visit to Werowocomoco for
171
Distress of the ColoniesMartin and Wests Settlements Arrival
181
The Virginia Massacre of 1622 and of 1641 or 1644Death of Ope
191
NEW ENGLAND INDIANS
199
Interview of Samoset with the Pilgrims
200
Tisquantum or Squanto the Guide and Interpreter of the Coloniets
204
The NarragansettsThe PequotsMurder of Stone and Oldham
209
Quarrel between the Narragansetts and MobegansUncas and Mian
219
The Indians furnished with FireArmsSituation of the Colonists
228
The Colonists going to Church armed during the Early Indian Wars
233
Attack on swangej Wileation of Tiboporiffigt at Miles Bridge
237
Atackson Hatnoy and DeerfieldGofre
246
Philips Return to PokanoketMajor Talcotts SuccessesChurch
256
Losses
267
Portrait of Captain Benjamin Church
272
General Outlines of Character c Impressions of the Inhabitants
279
Iroquois Tradition relative to their Former HistoryA Brief
286
Important Characters and Events of the Eighteenth CenturyBrant
295
Joseph Brant THAYENDANEGEA of Wyoming Notoriety
297
Connexion of the Six Nations with
312
General Sullivans Campaign against the IroquoisSubsequent War
321
Condition of the Six Nations subsequent to the RevolutionConclu
327
Present Condition of the Six Nations
336
PONTIACS
340
Red Jacket the Masterly Orator and Chief of the Senecas 33
343
Colonization of GeorgiaEarly Intercourse with the NativesTomo
390
Indian Settlement representing their Costumes Tents c g
393
Captain Steuarts AgencyDisturbance in 1767Visit of Tecumseh
402
General Jackson on his favorite White Charger
409
The Removal of the Cherokees west of the MississippiPresent Loca
411
The Esquimaux of Melville PeninsulaTheir Stature and Costume
426
Indians Watching for Salmon
433
VARIOUS NATIONS AND TRIBES
437
Personal Appearance and Peculiarities of the MandansTheir Hospi
442
Indians making their Offerings to the Dead
448
The Sioux continuedTheir Mode of LifeMaternal AffectionEx
455
Indians of the Great Western PrairiesTheir Summer and Winter
463
Indian Encampment West of the Mississippi
465
Tribes on the Columbia find its TributariesThe NezPercésTheir
473
The Grizzly Bear abounding in the Northwest Territory
480
TRIBES OF THE WEST INDIES
487
Portrait of Christopher Columbus
489
Indians of JamaicaCruise along the Southern Coast of CubaSpeech
495
The CaribsTheir Islands First Visited by ColumbusOrigin
506
Indians of Guiana and VenezuelaClassification The Arawaks
512
Maquarri Dance in the Lower District of Pomeroon
512
THE ABORIGINES OF PERU
519
Mythological TraditionsTopa Inca Yupanchi and his Son Fluayna
531
Pizarros Visit to Spain and Application to the EmperorHis Four
543
First Interview with the IncaPlans for his CaptureEntry of Ata
551
The Inca Atahualpa before Pizarro
561
March towards CuzcoOpposition of the NativesDeath of Toparca
563
THE ARAUCANIAN RACE
574
The Araucanians ProperCharacter and Habits of the TribeHouses
579
Army sent to Oppose the Progress of the SpaniardsBattle on
585
Don Garcia de Mendoza His Establishment at QuiriquinaFort
594
Viceroyalty of Martin LoyolaPaillamachuRenewal of the War
602
INDIAN TRIBES OF BRAZIL
609
Success of the Portuguese Against the NativesTheir Contests with
619
European Domestic Animals
624
IMPORTANT ERAS AND DATEB
637

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Seite 301 - I appeal to any white man to say, if ever he entered Logan's cabin hungry, and he gave him not meat; if ever he came cold and naked, and he clothed him not. During the course of the last long and bloody war, Logan remained idle in his cabin, an advocate for peace. Such was my love for the Whites, that my countrymen pointed as they passed, and said, ' Logan is the friend of white men.
Seite 39 - Of these fair solitudes once stir with life And burn with passion? Let the mighty mounds That overlook the rivers, or that rise In the dim forest crowded with old oaks, Answer. A race, that long has passed away, Built them; a disciplined and populous race Heaped, with long toil, the earth, while yet the Greek Was hewing the Pentelicus to forms Of symmetry, and rearing on its rock The glittering Parthenon.
Seite 301 - There runs not a drop of my blood in the veins of any living creature. This called on me for revenge. I have sought it : I have killed many : I have fully glutted my vengeance : for my country I rejoice at the beams of peace. But do not harbor a thought that mine is the joy of fear. Logan never felt fear. He will not turn on his heel to save his life. Who is there to mourn for Logan ? — Not one...
Seite 173 - Having reaccommodated themselves, they solemnly invited him to their lodgings, where he was no sooner within the house, but all these Nymphes more tormented him then ever, with crowding, pressing, and hanging about him, most tediously crying, Love you not me?
Seite 160 - ... two great stones were brought before Powhatan : then as many as could layd hands on him, dragged him to them, and thereon laid his head...
Seite 536 - It was conducted over pathless sierras buried in snow; galleries were cut for leagues through the living rock; rivers were crossed by means of bridges that swung suspended in the air; precipices were scaled by stairways hewn out of the native bed; ravines of hideous depth were filled up with solid masonry...
Seite 285 - I do not sleep; I have my eyes open, and the sun which enlightens me, discovers to me a great captain at the head of a company of soldiers, who speaks as if he were dreaming. He says that he only came to the lake to smoke on the great calumet with the Onondagas ; but Garangula says that he sees the contrary ; that it was to knock them on the head if sickness had not weakened the arms of the French.
Seite 200 - Soon after this, Morton says the Indians "got all the powaws in the country, who, for three days together, in a horid and devilish maner did curse and execrate them with their conjurations, which assembly and service they held in a dark and dismal swamp. Behold how Satan labored to hinder the gospel from coming into New England!
Seite 161 - King's dearest daughter, when no entreaty could prevail, got his head in her arms, and laid her own upon his to save him from death: whereat the Emperor was contented he should live to make him hatchets, and her bells, beads and copper; for they thought him as well of all occupations as themselves.
Seite 294 - WHEN the four Indian kings were in this country, about a twelvemonth ago, I often mixed with the rabble and followed them a whole day together, being wonderfully struck with the sight of every^ thing that is new or uncommon. I have, since their departure, employed a friend to make many inquiries of their landlord the upholsterer, relating to their manners and conversation,, as also concerning the remarks which they made in this country: for, next to...

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