Franklin: The Autobiography and Other Writings on Politics, Economics, and Virtue

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Cambridge University Press, 21.10.2004 - 381 Seiten
Benjamin Franklin is one of the best known and most widely admired figures in American history. His wit and charm make him endearing; his practical intelligence and commitment to middle-class virtues like thrift and industry make him admirable. Indeed to many he is 'the first American'. Ironically, this identification of Franklin with American popular culture diminishes the breadth and depth of his contributions to modern political thought. The present volume provides the textual foundation for a fuller understanding of Franklin's thought, and represents a major addition to the Cambridge Texts series. Readers interested in the Autobiography will find a new and complete edition based on the original manuscript. Those interested in the full range of Franklin's political ideas will find a selection of his most important letters, essays and pamphlets. Alan Houston's lucid introduction brings life to these texts and sets them in their proper historical context.
 

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Review: Franklin: The Autobiography And Other Writings On Politics, Economics, And Virtue

Nutzerbericht  - nat - Goodreads

Am I the only one who has a hard time enjoying listening to someone who clearly loves himself so dearly go on and on and on about himself? I mean, he wrote like 46 autobiographies. Sure he may have been a genius, but I'd just as soon other people tell me about it. Vollständige Rezension lesen

Inhalt

Acknowledgements page
xi
Chronology
xxxix
Biographical guide
xlvii
The Autobiography
liii
Plan of Conduct JulyOctober 1726
143
Apology for Printers 10 June 1731
159
Dialogue Between Two Presbyterians 10 April 1735
167
British Plantations in America 14 May 1743
174
An Edict by the King of Prussia 22 September 1773
302
On a Proposed Act to Prevent Emigration December? 1773
307
Proposed Articles of Confederation 21 July 1775
313
The Morals of Chess before 28 June 1779
317
The Whistle 10 November 1779
321
To Joseph Priestly 8 February 1780
323
To Joseph Priestly 7 June 1782
325
To Richard Price 13 June 1782
327

Form of the Association and Remarks into which Numbers
193
Observations concerning the Increase of Mankind Peopling
215
To Peter Collinson 9 May 1753
228
To Governor Shirley December 1754 with a Preface
256
To_ 13 December 1757
272
On the Price of Corn and Management of the Poor 29 November 1766
277
To Lord Kames 25 February 1767
281
Causes of the American Discontents Before 1768 7 January 1768
286
The Somersett Case and the Slave Trade 20 June 1772
294
Rules by which a Great Empire May Be Reduced to a Small One 11 September 1773
295
To Robert Morris 25 December 1783
328
Remarks Concerning the Savages of NorthAmerica 1783
330
To Sarah Franklin Bache 26 January 1784
336
Information to Those Who Would Remove to America February 1784
341
To Benjamin Vaughan 26 July 1784
349
At the Constitutional Convention JuneSeptember 1787
354
Queries and Remarks Respecting Alterations in the Constitution of Pennsylvania November 1789
364
On the Slave Trade 25 March 1790
369
Index
372
Urheberrecht

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Über den Autor (2004)

One of 17 children, Benjamin Franklin was born in Boston on January 17, 1706. He ended his formal education at the age of 10 and began working as an apprentice at a newspaper. Running away to Philadelphia at 17, he worked for a printer, later opening his own print shop. Franklin was a man of many talents and interests. As a writer, he published a colonial newspaper and the well-known Poor Richard's Almanack, which contains his famous maxims. He authored many political and economic works, such as The Way To Wealth and Journal of the Negotiations for Peace. He is responsible for many inventions, including the Franklin stove and bifocal eyeglasses. He conducted scientific experiments, proving in one of his most famous ones that lightning and electricity were the same. As a politically active citizen, he helped draft the Declaration of Independence and lobbied for the adoption of the U.S. Constitution. He also served as ambassador to France. He died in April of 1790 at the age of 84.

Alan Houston teaches in the department of political science at the University of California, San Diego.

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