The Modern Poet: Poetry, Academia, and Knowledge since the 1750s

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OUP Oxford, 09.08.2001 - 306 Seiten
Addressed to all readers of poetry, this is a wide-ranging book about the poet's role throughout the last three centuries. It argues that a conception of the poets as both primitive and sophisticated emerged in the 1750s. Encouraged by the classroom when English literary works began to be studied in universities, this view continues to shape our own attitudes towards verse. Whether considering Ossian and the Romantics, Victorian scholar-gipsies, Modernist poetries of knowledge, or contemporary poetry in Britian, Ireland, and America, The Modern Poet shows how many successive generations of poets have needed to collaborate and to battle with academia.
 

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Inhalt

II
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30
V
70
VI
113
VII
170
VIII
223
IX
267
X
285
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Seite 9 - I never heard the old song of Percy and Douglas that I found not my heart moved more than with a trumpet; and yet it is sung but by some blind crowder, with no rougher voice than rude style...
Seite 5 - And first, truly, to all them that, professing learning, inveigh against poetry may justly be objected that they go very near to ungratefulness to seek to deface that which, in the noblest nations and languages that are known, hath been the first lightgiver to ignorance...

Über den Autor (2001)

Robert Crawford is Professor of Modern Scottish Literature at the University of St Andrews, and author of four volumes of poetry and four books of criticism. He is co-editor (with Simon Armitage) of The Penguin Book of Poetry from Britain and Ireland since 1945.

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