History of Medical Education and Institutions in the United States: From the First Settlement of the British Colonies to the Year 1850; with a Chapter on the Present Condition and Wants of the Profession, and the Means Necessary for Supplying Those Wants, and Elevating the Character and Extending the Usefulness of the Whole Profession

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S. C. Griggs & Company, 1851 - 228 Seiten
 

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Seite 127 - There is no profession, from the members of which greater purity of character and a higher standard of moral excellence are required, than the medical ; and to attain such eminence is a duty every Physician owes alike to his profession and to his patients. It is due to the latter, as without it he cannot command their respect and confidence, and to both, because no scientific attainments can compensate for the want of correct moral principles.
Seite 127 - A physician should not only be ever ready to obey the calls of the sick, but his mind ought also to be imbued with the greatness of his mission, and the responsibility he habitually incurs in its discharge. These obligations are the more deep and enduring, because there is no tribunal other than his own conscience to adjudge penalties for carelessness or neglect.
Seite 91 - ... punished by fine not exceeding five hundred dollars, and imprisonment not exceeding six months, or either...
Seite 134 - The faculty of every regularly constituted medical college or chartered school of medicine shall have the privilege of sending two delegates. The professional staff of every chartered or municipal hospital, containing a hundred inmates or more, shall have the privilege of sending two delegates, — and every other permanently organized medical institution of good standing shall have the privilege of sending one delegate.
Seite 127 - Physicians should, therefore, minister to the sick with due impressions of the importance of their office; reflecting that the ease, the health, and the lives of those committed to their charge, depend on their skill, attention and fidelity. They should study, also, in their deportment, so to unite tenderness with firmness, and condescension with authority, as to inspire the minds of their patients with gratitude, respect and confidence.
Seite 120 - ... a good English education, a knowledge of natural philosophy, and the elementary mathematical sciences, including geometry and algebra, and such an acquaintance, at least, with the Latin and Greek languages as will enable them to appreciate the technical language of medicine, and read and write prescriptions.
Seite 67 - ... altogether. I was encouraged to cherish this hope, by having known delivery to take place, in one instance, during a paroxysm of epilepsy, and having heard of another, during a fit of drunkenness, in a woman attended by Dr. Church, in both of which there was neither consciousness, nor recollection of pain.
Seite 134 - Each State, county and district medical society entitled to representation shall have the privilege of sending to the Association one delegate for every ten of its regular resident members, and one for every additional fraction of more than half that number...
Seite 67 - Repository,' vol. vi.), that a medicine would be discovered that should suspend sensibility altogether, and leave irritability, or the powers of motion, unimpaired, and thereby destroy labor-pains altogether. I was encouraged to cherish this hope, by having known delivery to take place, in one instance, during a paroxysm of epilepsy, and having heard of another, during a fit of drunkenness, in a woman attended by Dr.
Seite 86 - This act shall be so construed as to prevent all irregular bred pretenders to the healing art, under the names or titles of practical botanists, root or Indian doctors, or any other name or title involving quackery of any species, from practicing their deceptions, and imposing...

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