Remarks on the Beauties of Poetry, Ausgabe 1

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R. and J. Dodsley, 1762 - 123 Seiten
 

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Seite 40 - O gentle sleep, Nature's soft nurse, how have I frighted thee, That thou no more wilt weigh my eyelids down, And steep my senses in forgetfulness...
Seite 15 - Th' infernal Serpent ; he it was, whose guile Stirr'd up with Envy and Revenge, deceiv'd The Mother of Mankind, what time his Pride Had cast him out from Heav'n, with all his Host Of Rebel Angels, by whose aid aspiring To set himself in Glory...
Seite 73 - But let concealment like a worm i' th' bud Feed on her damask cheek: she pin'd in thought, And with a green and yellow melancholy, She sat like Patience on a Monument, Smiling at grief.
Seite 77 - You may shape, Amintor, Causes to cozen the whole world withal, And yourself too ; but 'tis not like a friend To hide your soul from me. 'Tis not your nature To be thus idle : I have seen you stand As you were blasted 'midst of all your mirth ; Call thrice aloud, and then start, feigning joy So coldly ! — World, what do I here ? a friend Is nothing.
Seite 13 - Of night's extended shade, from eastern point Of Libra to the fleecy star that bears Andromeda far off Atlantic seas. Beyond the horizon : then from pole to pole He views in breadth, and without longer pause Down right into the world's first region throws His flight precipitant, and winds with ease Through the pure marble air his oblique way Amongst innumerable stars, that shone Stars distant, but nigh hand seem'd other worlds ; Or other worlds they seem'd, or happy isles...
Seite 7 - That, chang'd thro' all, and yet in all the same, Great in the earth, as in th' ethereal frame, Warms in the sun, refreshes in the breeze, Glows in the stars, and blossoms in the trees, Lives thro
Seite 87 - Now entertain conjecture of a time, When creeping murmur, and the poring dark, Fills the wide vessel of the universe. From camp to camp, through the foul womb of night, The hum of either army stilly sounds, That the fix'd sentinels almost receive The secret whispers of each other's watch...
Seite 123 - In thefe principles, and in the examples by which they have been fupported, we fee clearly the reafon why every enlightened age has had, and muft continue to have, its original Writers. We have no right, therefore, to complain that nature is always the fame, or that the fources of novelty have been exhaufted. It is in Poetry as in Philofophy, new relations are ftruck out, new influences difcovered, and every fuperior genius moves in a world of his own.
Seite 55 - The downy feather, on the cordage hung, Moves not; the flat sea shines like yellow gold, Fus'd in the fire ; or like the marble floor 'Of some old temple wide. But where...
Seite 68 - But immediately after this the poet adds, For works may have more wit than does 'em good. Now let us substitute the definition in the place of the thing, and it will stand thus: A work may have more of nature dressed to advantage, than will do it good.

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