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Why in the singular, why in the

plural number? Why in the comparative degree, &c.? Why placed after its substantive?

Why omitted ? Why repeated.? Pronoun. What is its antecedent?

Why is it in the singular, why in the

plural number? Why of the masculine, why of the fem

enine, why of the neuter gender? Why of the first, of the second, or of

the third person?
Why is it the nominative case ?
Why the possessive? Why the oby

jective?

Why omitted? Why repeated ?
Verb. What is Its nominative case ?

What case does it gorern?
Why is it in the singular, why in the

plural number?
Why in the first person, &c.?
Why is it in the infinitive mood?
Why in the subjunctive, &c. ?
Why in this particular tense ?"
What relation has it to another verb

in point of time?
Why do participles sometimes govern

the objective ?
Why is the verb omitted? Why re-

peated ?
Adverb. What is its proper situation?

Why is the double negative used?

Why rejected?
Preposition. What case does it govern?

Which is the word governed?
Why this preposition?

Why omitted? Why repeated?. Conjunction. What moods, tenses, or cases, does it

connect? And why? What mood does it require ? Why omitted! Why repeated?

Interjection, Why does the nominative case follow

it? Why the objective? Why omitted? Why repeated :

8 ECT. II.

Specimen of Syntactical Parsing.

Vice degrades us. Vice is a common substantive, of the third person, in the singular number, and the nominative case. Degrades is a regular verb active, indicative mood, present tense, third person singular, agreeing with its nominative " vice,'' according to RULE 1, which says : | here repeat the rule.] Us is a personal pronoun, first person plural, in the objective case, and governed by the active verb degrades,' agreeable to AULE XI, which says, &c. He who lives virtuously, prepares for all

events, He is de personal pronunn, of the third person, singular number, and masculine gender. Who is a relative pronoun, which has for its antecedent "he," with which it agrees in gender and puniber, according to RULE V, which says, &c. Lires is a regular verb neuter, indicative mood, present tense, third person singular, agreeing with its nominative 6 whô,” according to RÜLE VI, which says, ds:Virtuously is an adverb of quality. Prepares is a regular verb neuter, indicative mood, present tense, third person singular, agreeing with its nominative the. For is a preposition. All is an adjective pronoun, of the indefinite kind, the plural number, and belongs to its substantive "events," with which it agrers, according to RULE-Vit., which says, &c. Erents is à common substantive, of the third person, in the plurål number, and the olijective case, governed by the preposition " for,"? according to RULE XVII, which says, &c. If folly entice thee, reject its allurements.

If is a. copulative conjunction. Folly is a common substantive, of the third person, in the single

lar number, and the nominative case.

Entice is 2 regular verb active, subjunctive mood, present tense, third person singular, and is governed by the conjunction " if,” according to RULE XIX, which says, &c. Thee is a personal pronoun, of the second person singular, in the objective case, governed by the active verb “entice," agreeably to RULE XI, which says, &c. Reject is a regular active verb; imperative mood, second person singu. lar, and agrees with its nominative case "thou" implied. Its is a personal pronoun, third person, singular number, and of the neuter gender, to a. gree with its substantive "folly,” according to RULE V, which says, &c. It is in the possessive case, governed by the noun “allurements," agree ably to RULE X, which says, &c. Allurements is a common substantive, of the third person, in the plural number, and the objective case, governed by the verb “ reject,” according to RULE XI, which

says, &c.

SEOT. III,
Etercises on the first, second, third and fourth

Rules of Syntax.* 1. The contented mind spreads ease and cheerfulness around it.

The school of experience teaches many useful lessons.

In the path of life are many thorns, as well as floweis.

Thou shouldst do justice to all men, even to enemies.

2. Vanity and presumption ruin many a promising youth.

Food, clothing, and credit, are the rewards of industry.

He and William live together in great harmony.

* In parsing these Exercises, the pupil should repeat the respective rule of Syntar, and show that it applies to the sentence which he is parsing.

3. No age, nor condition, is exempt from trouble.

Wealth, or virtue, or any valuable acquisition, is not attainable by idle wishes.

4. The American nation is great and generous.

The company is assembled. It is composed of persons possessing very different sentiments.

A herd of cattle, peacefully grazing, affords a pleasing sight.

SECT. IV.

Excercises on the fifth, 'sixth, seventh and eighth

Rules of Syntax. 5. The man who is faithfully attached to religion, may be relied on with confidence.

The vises which we should especially avoid, are those which most easily beset ue.

6. They who are born in high stations, are not always happy.

Our parents and teachers are the persons whom we ought, in a particular manner, to respect.

If our friend is in trouble, we whom he knows and loves, may console him.

7. Thou art the man who has improved his privileges, and who will reap the reward.

I am the person, who owns a fault committed, and who disdains to conceal it by falsehood.

8. That sort of pleasure weakens and debases the mind.

Even in these times, there are many persons, who, from disinterested motives, are solicitous to promote the happiness of others.

SECT. V. Exercises on the ninth, tenth, eleventh and twelfth

Rules of Syntax. 9. The restless, discontented person, is not a good friend, a good neighbor, or a good subject.

The young, the healthy, and the prosperous, shou'd not presume on their advantages.

10. The scholar's diligence will secure the ta. tor's approbation,

The good pareut's greatest joy, is, to see his children wise and virtuous.

11. Wisdom and virtue ennoble us. Vice and tolly (lebase us.

Whom can we xo justly love, as them who have endeavorr.d to inake us wise and happy?

12. When a person has nothing to do, he is alvost always tempted to do wrong.

We need uot urge Charles to do good ; he loves to do it.

We dare uot leave our studies without per, mission,

SECT. II.

Everris's on the thirteenth, fourteenth, rifternitt,

sitteenth and ritenieenth Rules of Syntat. 13. The buziness is, at last, completed; but jours ago, I intended to do it.

! expected tu see the king, before he left. Windsor.

'The misfortunę did heppen; but we early hoped and endeavored to prevent it,

To have been censured by so judicious a friend, would have greatly discouraged ine.

14. Having early disgraced himsdl, he became. mean and dispirited.

Knowing him tu be my superior, I cheerfully submitted.

15. We should always prepare for the worst, and hope for the best.

A young man, su learned and virtuous, promises to be a very useful inember of society,

When our virtuous friends die, they are not lost forever; they ar'ð vins gone before us to a happier world.

16. Neither threatenings, nor any promises, - could make him violate the truth.

Charles is not inslucerc; and there ore we may trust

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