Dramatic Works: From the Text of Johnson, Stevens and Reed; with Glossarial Notes, Life, Etc, Band 3

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Seite 24 - Once more unto the breach, dear friends, once more ; Or close the wall up with our English dead ! In peace there's nothing so becomes a man As modest stillness and humility : But when the blast of war blows in our ears, Then imitate the action of the tiger ; Stiffen the sinews, summon up the blood...
Seite 24 - That those whom you call'd fathers did beget you. Be copy now to men of grosser blood, And teach them how to war. And you, good yeomen, Whose limbs were made in England, show us here The mettle of your pasture; let us swear That you are worth your breeding, which I doubt not; For there is none of you so mean and base, That hath not noble lustre in your eyes. I see you stand like greyhounds in the slips, Straining upon the start. The game's afoot! Follow your spirit, and upon this charge Cry, "God...
Seite 392 - Cromwell ! I did not think to shed a tear In all my miseries, but thou hast forced me, Out of thy honest truth, to play the woman Let's dry our eyes; and thus far hear me, Cromwell ! And, when I am forgotten, as I shall be, And sleep in dull, cold marble, where no mention Of me must...
Seite 2 - On this unworthy scaffold to bring forth So great an object : can this cockpit hold The vasty fields of France ? or may we cram Within this wooden O the very casques That did affright the air at Agincourt...
Seite 265 - Why, I, in this weak piping time of peace, Have no delight to pass away the time, Unless to spy my shadow in the sun, And descant on mine own deformity: And therefore, since I cannot prove a lover, To entertain these fair well-spoken days. I am determined to prove a villain, And hate the idle pleasures of these days.
Seite 255 - My parks, my walks, my manors that I had, Even now forsake me ; and, of all my lands, Is nothing left me, but my body's length ! Why, what is pomp, rule, reign, but earth and dust? And, live we how we can, yet die we must.
Seite iv - This story shall the good man teach his son; And Crispin Crispian shall ne'er go by, From this day to the ending of the world, But we in it shall be remembered ; We few, we happy few, we band of brothers ; For he to-day that sheds his blood with me Shall be my brother ; be he ne'er so vile, This day shall gentle his condition : And gentlemen in England now a-bed Shall think themselves accursed they were not here, And hold their manhoods cheap whiles any speaks That fought with us upon Saint Crispin's...
Seite 282 - With that, methought, a legion of foul fiends Environ'd me, and howled in mine ears Such hideous cries, that, with the very noise, I trembling waked, and, for a season after, Could not believe but that I was in hell, Such terrible impression made my dream.
Seite iii - Be in their flowing cups freshly remember'd : This story shall the good man teach his son ; And Crispin Crispian shall ne'er go by, From this day to the ending of the world, But we in it shall be remembered : We few, we happy few, we band of brothers ; For he, to-day that sheds his blood with me, Shall be my brother; be he ne'er so vile, This day shall gentle his condition : And gentlemen in England, now a-bed, Shall think themselves...

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