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19. He raised himself up and looked round; and after a minute rose and walked humbly down to the lowest bench, and sat down on the very seat which he nad occupied on his first Sunday at Rugby. And then the old memories rushed back again, but softened and subdued, and soothing him as he let himself be carried away by them. And he looked up at the great painted window above the altar, and remembered how, when a little boy, he used to try not to look through it at the elm trees and the rocks, before the painted glass came—and the subscription for the painted glass, and the letter he wrote home for money to give to it. And there, down below, was the very name of the boy who sat on his right hand on that first day, scratched rudely in the oak paneling.

20. And then came the thought of all his old schoolfellows, and form after form of boys, nobler, and braver, and purer than he, rose up and seemed to rebuke him. Could he not think of them, and what they had felt and were feeling; they who had honored and loved from the first the man whom he had taken years to know and love? Could he not think of those yet dearer to him who was gone, who bore his name and shared his blood, and were now without a husband or a father ?

21. Then the grief which he began to share with others became gentle and holy, and he rose up once more, and walked up the steps to the altar; and while tears flowed

ир freely down his cheeks, knelt down humbly and hopefully, to lay down there his share of a burden which had proved itself too heavy for him to bear in his own strength.

22. Here let us leave him—where better could we leave him, than at the altar, before which he had first caught a glimpse of the glory of his birthright, and felt the drawing of the bond which links all living souls together in one brotherhood ?-at the grave beneath the altar of him who had opened his eyes to see that glory, and softened his heart till it could feel that bond.

T. HUGHES.

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In there came old Alice the nurse,

Said, “Who was this that went from thee?" “It was my cousin,” said Lady Clare;

To-morrow he weds with me.”

V.

“O God be thanked!” said Alice the nurse,

“That all comes round so just and fair: Lord Ronald is heir of all your lands,

And you are not the Lady Ciare."

VI.

“Are ye out of your mind, my nurse, my nurse?".

Said Lady Clare, “that ye speak so wild ?” “ As God's above,” said Alice the nurse,

“I speak the truth: you are my child.

VII.

“The old earl's daughter died at my breast:

I speak the truth as I live by bread ! I buried her like my own sweet child,

And put my child in her stead.”

VIII.

“Falsely, falsely have ye done,

O mother,” she said, “if this be true, To keep the best man under the sun So many years from his due.”

IX.

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Nay now, my child,” said Alice the nurse,

But keep the secret for your life, And all you have will be Lord Ronald's

When you are man and wife.”

X.

“If I'm a beggar born,” she said,

“I will speak out, for I dare not lie: Pull off, pull off the brooch of gold,

And fling the diamond necklace by.”

XI.

“Nay now, my child,” said Alice the nurse,

“But keep the secret all ye can.” She said, “Not so: but I will know,

If there be any faith in man.”

XII.

“Nay now, what faith?” said Alice the nurse;

“The man will cleave unto his right.” “And he shall have it,” the lady replied,

“Though I should die to-night."

XIII.

Yet give one kiss to your mother dear!

Alas, my child, I sinned for thee.” O mother, mother, mother!” she said,

“So strange it seems to me.

XIV.

" Yet here's a kiss for my mother dear,

My mother dear, if this be so; And lay your hand upon my head, And bless me, mother, ere I go.”

XV.

She clad herself in a russet gown

She was no longer Lady Clare:
She went by dale, and she went by down,

With a single rose in her hair.

XVI.

The lily-white doe Lord Ronald had brought

Leapt up from where she lay,
Dropt her head in the maiden's hand,

And followed her all the way.

XVII.

Down stept Lord Ronald from his tower:

“O Lady Clare, you shame your worth! Why come you drest like a village maid,

That are the flower of the earth ?”

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He laughed a laugh of merry scorn:

He turned and kissed her where she stood: “If you are not the heiress born,

And I," said he, “the next of blood

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