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NICHOLSON'S

CAMBRIAN

TRAVELLER'S GUIDE,

IN EVERY DIRECTION;

CONTAINING

REMARKS MADE DURING MANY EXCURSIONS

IN THE

Principality of Wales,

AUGMENTED BY

EXTRACTS FROM THE BEST WRITERS.

THIRD EDITION,

REVISED AND CORRECTED BY HIS SON,

THE REV. EMILIUS NICHOLSON,

INCUMBENT OF MINSTERLEY, SALOP.

LONDON:

PRINTED FOR

LONGMAN, ORME, BROWN, GREEN, & LONGMANS,

PATERNOSTER-ROW.

1840.

LONDON: Printed by A. SportISWOODE,

New-Street-Square.

THE EDITOR'S PREFACE.

In addition to the accompanying explanatory observations by the Author, it is expedient to state, that subsequently to his lamented decease, the “ Cambrian Traveller's Guide” remained out of print upwards of ten years. During this period considerable improvements had occurred, and a revision of the copy prepared by the author for the third edition became requisite. This his son has with diffidence undertaken, anxious to realize the wish of his departed parent, that the work should reappear, with his own emendations, in a form more condensed. With a view to com. pression, the heavy articles relative to the bordering towns have been omitted, there being now Guides of accuracy and merit descriptive of Chester, Shrewsbury, Ludlow, Worcester, Hereford, Gloucester, Cheltenham, and Bristol. By this omission, which alone interferes with the Author's arrangement, an opportunity is gained of enlarging the articles strictly Welsh, recommending as auxiliaries, according to the route selected, those local guides, as the case may require. During a recent tour in Wales, the editor embodied in these pages considerable local information, and much is inserted of later date than is contained in any topographical work. The three Indexes of the second edition he has included in one, in which is contained a great accession of references relative to proprietors, residents, and other subjects. With regard to the alterations in the orthography of proper names, general style, and other points of mere taste, the reader may judge of their respective merits by comparing this with former editions. Various notices are thrown into most of the leading articles, which to the friend of the angle will doubtless prove acceptable. As far as his numerous professional avocations would permit, to the utmost in his power he has endeavoured to render this work worthy of the public approval. Should he fail in doing so, he will have at least the pleasing reflection of having attempted to fulfil the express desire of the lamented Author. As others have availed themselves freely of this work, the Editor has occasionally taken advantage of theirs. The task of conveying the same ideas in other words when already happily expressed, is but an unprofitable employment: many passages from recent writers are therefore quoted which it would have been tedious to acknowledge.

To the contemplative intelligent tourist Wales affords ample subjects of interest, wbether he considers its picturesque, geological, or botanical peculiarities. The scenery of Wales is eminently attractive, affording every variety from the lowly valley adorned by the serpentine mazes of the silver stream, to the alpine range which mingles its hoary summit with the clouds and associates the mind with the regions of that pure ethereal where reigns

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