The Cornhill Magazine, Band 16;Band 20

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George Smith, William Makepeace Thackeray
Smith, Elder., 1867
 

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Seite 51 - Then Satan answered the LORD, and said, Doth Job fear God for nought ? Hast not thou made an hedge about him, and about his house, and about all that he hath on every side ? thou hast blessed the work of his hands, and his substance is increased in the land. But put forth thine hand now, and touch all that he hath, and he will curse thee to thy face.
Seite 542 - Love had he found in huts where poor Men lie ; His daily Teachers had been Woods and Rills, The silence that is in the starry sky, The sleep that is among the lonely hills.
Seite 39 - And religion, the greatest and most important of the efforts by which the human race has manifested its impulse to perfect itself, — religion, that voice of the deepest human experience,— does not only enjoin and sanction the aim which is the great aim of culture, the aim of setting ourselves to ascertain what perfection is and to make it prevail...
Seite 22 - The strength of a chain is the strength of its weakest link, the engineers tell us," said Longworth, •' and it is the same with evidence.
Seite 44 - But the idea of beauty and of a human nature perfect on all its sides, which is the dominant idea of poetry, is a true and invaluable idea, though it has not yet had the success that the idea of conquering the obvious faults of our animality, and of a human nature perfect on the moral side,— which is the dominant idea of religion,— has been enabled to have...
Seite 53 - Plenty of people will try to give the masses, as they call them, an intellectual food prepared and adapted in the way they think proper for the actual condition of the masses. The ordinary popular literature is an example of this way of working on the masses.
Seite 38 - The first motive which ought to impel us to study is the desire to augment the excellence .of our nature, and to render an intelligent being yet more intelligent.
Seite 549 - Comfort? comfort scorn'd of devils! this is truth the poet sings; That a sorrow's crown of sorrow is remembering happier things.
Seite 53 - It does not try to teach down to the level of inferior classes; it does not try to win them for this or that sect of its own, with ready-made judgments and watchwords. It seeks to do away with classes; to make the best that has been thought and known in the world current everywhere; to make all men live in an atmosphere of sweetness and light, where they may use ideas, as it uses them itself, freely,— nourished and not bound by them.
Seite 38 - ... worthy of blame and not of praise. For as there is a curiosity about intellectual matters which is futile, and merely a disease, so there is certainly a curiosity, — a desire after the things of the mind simply for their own sakes and for the pleasure of seeing them as they are, — which is, in an intelligent being, natural and laudable.

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