Geological Magazine, Band 2

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Cambridge University Press, 1865
 

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Seite 48 - What City Swans once sung within the walls; Much she revolves their arts, their ancient praise, And sure succession down from Heywood's days.
Seite 447 - The character of the constituent particles of meteorites, and their general microscopical structure, differ so much from what is seen in terrestrial volcanic rocks, that it appears to me extremely improbable that they were ever portions of the moon, or of a planet, which differed from a large meteorite in having been the seat of a more or less modified volcanic action. A most careful study of their microscopical structure leads me to conclude that their constituents were originally at such a high...
Seite 73 - Jamieson referred that of the formation of the submarine forest-beds, which he considered was succeeded by a Second Period of Depression, and this again by the elevation of the land to its present position. It is in the old estuary beds and beaches formed during the Second Period of Depression that the author finds the first traces of Man in Scotland, while the Shell-mounds with chipped flints he referred to the same epoch as the blown sand and beds of peat, namely to the most recent period, during...
Seite 25 - Nevertheless, just as though ignorant of the precise height and size of a mountain-range seen in the. distance, we need not wait for trigonometrical measurements to feel satisfied in our own minds of the magnitude of the distant peaks, so with this geological epoch, we see and know enough of it to feel how distant it is from our time, and yet we are not in a position at present to solve with accuracy the curious and interesting problem of its precise age.
Seite 464 - ... my native mountainous country Scotland, and fully admitting that on adequate inclines ice and water must, during long periods, have produced great denudation of the rocks, I maintain that such reasoning is quite inadequate to explain the manifest proofs of convulsive agency which abound all over the crust of the earth, and even are to be seen in many of the mines in the very tract in which we are assembled. " Thus, to bring such things to the mind's eye of persons who are acquainted with this...
Seite 458 - ... especially those devoted to Zoo'logy, Physiology, and Ethnology. Let us not expect or desire for them, a very quick, or, at present, a very definite settlement. Deep shadows have gathered over all the earlier ages of mankind, which perhaps still longer periods of time may not avail to remove. Yet let us not undervalue the progress of ethnological inquiry, nor fail to mark how, within the period to which our recollections cling, the revelations of early Egypt have been followed by a chronology...
Seite 347 - They stood aloof, the scars remaining, Like cliffs which had been rent asunder; A dreary sea now flows between. But neither heat, nor frost, nor thunder, Shall wholly do away, I ween, The marks of that which once hath been.
Seite 447 - Proceedings of the Royal Society," (xiii, 333) there is good proof of the material of meteorites having been to some extent fused, and in the state of minute detached particles. I had also met with facts which seemed to show that some portions had condensed from a state of vapor ; and expected that it would be requisite to adopt a modified nebular hypothesis, but hesitated until I had obtained more satisfactory evidence. The character of the constituent particles of meteorites and their general microscopical...
Seite 432 - One of the most remarkable features of this strange reptile is the manner in which it was clothed with bony armour, plates of bone from half an inch to 4 inches in diameter, and about half an inch thick, covered its body with the exception of its back, which was protected by a great bony shield. Another remarkable characteristic of this animal was a very curious process of spine-like bones, which ran along the sides of the body and tail, some of which are 15 inches long, and weigh 7 pounds.
Seite 190 - ... molluscs, he stated that great caution was necessary to distinguish them from those left by Nereids; and instanced the case of a foot-track of a common whelk resembling the marks made by the Crossopodia on the Silurian slates. When the track of the whelk is filled up by the dry sand blown into the depression in the line of progress, no difficulty is felt in...

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