Proceedings, American Philosophical Society (vol. 142, no. 1, 1998)

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Seite 85 - I conjure you, by that which you profess, Howe'er you come to know it, answer me: Though you untie the winds and let them fight Against the churches; though the yesty waves Confound and swallow navigation up; Though bladed corn be lodged and trees blown down; Though castles topple on their warders...
Seite 101 - Tis two or three, my lord, that bring you word, Macduff is fled to England. Macb. Fled to England? Len. Ay, my good lord. Macb. Time, thou anticipat'st my dread exploits : The flighty purpose never is o'ertook, Unless the deed go with it. From this moment The very firstlings of my heart shall be The firstlings of my hand. And even now, To crown my thoughts with acts, be it thought and done. The castle of Macduff I will surprise ; Seize upon Fife ; give to the edge o' the sword His wife, his babes,...
Seite 108 - I have lived long enough : my way of life Is fall'n into the sear, the yellow leaf ; And that which should accompany old age, As honour, love, obedience, troops of friends, I must not look to have...
Seite 98 - I will,) to the weird sisters: More shall they speak ; for now I am bent to know, By the worst means, the worst: for mine own good, All causes shall give way; I am in blood Stepped in so far, that, should I wade no more, Returning were as tedious as go o'er: Strange things I have in head, that will to hand; Which must be acted, ere they may be scann'd.
Seite 108 - And be these juggling fiends no more believed, ;>< That palter with us in a double sense; That keep the word of promise to our ear, And break it to our hope.
Seite 96 - Is fall'n into the sear, the yellow leaf ; And that which should accompany old age, As honour, love, obedience, troops of friends, I must not look to have ; but, in their stead, Curses, not loud but deep, mouth-honour, breath, Which the poor heart would fain deny, and dare not.
Seite 108 - tis strange : And oftentimes, to win us to our harm, The instruments of darkness tell us truths : Win -us with honest trifles, to betray us In deepest consequence.
Seite 87 - I am settled, and bend up Each corporal agent to this terrible feat. Away, and mock the time with fairest show : False face must hide what the false heart doth know.
Seite 29 - The learned baron will, I hope, recognize in the conjugations of the Delaware verbs those inflected forms which he justly admires, and he will find that the process which he is pleased to call agglutination, is not the only one which our Indians employ in the combination of their ideas and the formation of their words.
Seite 84 - But let the frame of things disjoint, both the worlds suffer, Ere we will eat our meal in fear, and sleep In the affliction of these terrible dreams, That shake us nightly...

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