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sequent happiness of its members. We must rejoice in the increase of information and good sense among our poorer brethren, for where intelligence is most rife, where reason is most cultivated there will ever be found habits of the greatest industry, and there will ever dwell the greatest comfort and peace. In reverting to the intelligence visible among the lower classes, we must not forget to mention one who has distinguished herself above all the rest of her townspeople by literary merit, we refer to our poetess of humble life, Mary Maria Colling. To her kind benefactress Mrs. Bray she is indebted for being brought into public notice. Her fables in verse published in 1830 have won the admiration of the great and learned, and even our poet laureate did not consider her simple effusions beneath the praise of his pen. Mrs. Bray affixed to the fables an interesting account of her life and parentage. Such an introduction was certain to procure for the modest authoress sufficient patronage and support. Tavistock indeed owes much to Mrs. Bray for bringing forward its most interesting points of scenery as well as the principal objects of note in its vicinity. By her able fictions she has thrown a charm around the neighbourhood which few places are privileged to possess. Every spot is connected with some curious association : the legends of old have not been suffered to fall to neglect: Mrs. Bray's masterly descriptions have brought our landscapes in the vivid colors of reality before our view: her minute perception of peculiar customs, manmers and language, has made us better acquainted with our poorer neighbours, than even by having dwelt all our lives among them. For the many years of labor devoted to an illustration of our home scenes, let us be allowed to offer her our humble meed of gratitude and praise. s

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To return to our institutions;–The grammar-School, so high in repute under monastic rule, but which could boast of nothing but the name in later times has lately received under the patronage of the Duke of Bedford. A Mathematical and Commercial school is also established under the surveillance of a committee of Gentlemen; * the increasing population of the neighbourhood can well support two such institutions, which are commonly found in all the respectable towns in Scotland. There is a British-School maintained principally by charitable subscriptions. The National School is supported in a similar manner. Sunday Schools are attached to all the religious communities. The first in Tavistock for children and adults was established at the Abbey Chapelby the Rev. W. Evans, who, about fifty years since found the poorer classes in the greatestignorance, few of them being able to read or write. We have only at present to desire the institution of an Infant School, or a play-ground for the little ones, who now run screaming through the streets or are immured for a certain number of hours within the vitiating influence of the dense and impure atmosphere of a Dame's School. The frame is weakened, and the mind warped, by the evil tendency of such an early education. Let the infant poor breathe the fresh air of heaven, untainted by the sickening influence of poverty and want. Let their minds expand, and their frames be invigorated by the generous glow of kindly feelings, which are allowed time and liberty to be seen and felt. Let their mothers rejoice in their visible improvement, and not feel ashamed to

* An Agricultural school, on a similar plan to that of Fellenberg's in Switzerland, was once suggested, which would have superseded the above mentioned Commercial establishment; the facilities of the neighbourhood for an agricultural institution are great; but reasons have been given for not attempting so extensive an undertaking.

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HOME SCENES, OR

confess to their own hearts that they are weary of their children. We look in vain, amidst our town population for that vigorous frame, and energy of mind which is born amidst country scenes. They want space, they want liberty to grow to the full stature of man. Let us care for the well-being of the infant, and the child will reward us for our pains; let us train up the faculties of the child: and we fear not for the character of the adult. “As the twig is bent so the tree is inclined.” If we wish to aspire to grandeur in our town, let us load it with the dwellings of the proud; if we desire to increase its real wealth and prosperity let us build up the character of its poor.

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