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PRINTED FOR BELL & BRADFUTE, J. DICKSON,,
W. CREECH, J. &... FAIRBALEN, AND

T, DUNCAN, BOOKSELLERS.

160020

ATOR, LENOX AND TILOEN FAMINDATIONS.

1899.

JULIUS CÆSAR.

DRAMATIS PERSONÆ.

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Jolios CESAR.

A Soothfaryer. Odavius Cæsar,

Triumvirs Young Cato. M. Antony,

after thedeath Cinna, a poet. Le

Lucilius, Cicero,

Dardanius, Brutus,

Volumnius, ! Cassius,

Varro, Calca,

fervants to Brutus. Clitus,

conspirators Claudius, Treborius, agains? Hve Strato, Ligarius,

lius Cæjar. | Lucius, Decius Brutus, Mereilas Cimber,

Pindarus, forvant to Cafius. Cinna,

J

Ghost of Julius Cæsar.
Popilius Læ01,2

Cobler.
Senators.
Publius,

Carpenter.
Flavius,

Ti ibunes, and ene- Other Plebeians. Marullus, mies to Cæfur.

Calphurnia, roife to Cæfar.
Messala, friends to Brutus and

Portia, quife to Brutus.
Titinius, $ Collies.
Artemidorus, a fophift of Cuidos.

Guards and Attendants.

SCENE, for the tree forft asis, at Rome; afterwards, at an ifte

near Mutina, at Sardis, and Philippi.

ACT I. SCENE I.

A freet in Rome.

Enter. Flavius, Marullus, and certain Commoners.

Flar. HENCE ; home, you idle creatures, get your

home.
Is this a holiday? what! know you not,
Being mechanical, you ought not walk
Upon a labouring day, without the sign
Of your profeffion? Speak, what trade-art thou?
VOL. VII.

А

Car.

Car. Why, Sir, a carpenter.

Mar. Where is thy leather apron, and thy rule?
What dost thou with thy beft apparel on?
You, Sir,-

-What trade are you? Cob. Truly, Sir, in respect of a fine workman, I am but, as you would fay, a cobler.

Alar. But what trade art thou? Anfwer me directly.

Cob. A trade, Sir, that I hope I may use with a safe conscience ; which is indeed, Sir, a nender of bad foals.

Flav. What trade, thou knave? thou naughty knave, what trade?

Cob. Nay, I beseech you, Sir, be not out with me : yet if you

be out, Sir, I can mend you. Flav. What mean'st thou by that? mend me, thou faucy fellow?

Cob. Why, Sir, coble you.
Flav. Thou art a cobler, art thou?

Cob. Truly, Sir, all that I live by, is the awl. I meddle with no mnens' matters, nor woman's matters ; but withal I am, indeed, Sir, a furgeon to old shoes ; when they are in great danger, I re-cover them. As proper men as ever trod upon neats-lether have gone upon my handy-work.

Flav. But wherefore art not in thy shop to-day? Why doft thou lead these men about the streets ?

Cob. “ Truly, Sir, to wear out their shoes, to get “ myself into more work.” But indeed, Sir, we make holiday to see Cæsar, and to rejoice in his triumph.

Mar. Wherefore rejoice !-what conquest brings he What tributaries follow him to Rome, [home? To grace in captive bonds his chariot-wheels ? You blocks, you stones, you worse than senseless things ! O you hard hearts !

you

cruel men of Rome! Knew you not Pompey? many a time and oft Have

you

climb'd up to walls and battlements, 'To towers and windows, yea, to chimney-tops, Your infants in your arms; and there have fat. The live-long day with patient expectation, To see great Pompey pass the streets of Rome. And when you saw his chariot but appear, Have you not made an universal shout,

That

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