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-scroll pediment head-bracket feet--the whole finished in a workmanlike manner, and well worth the attention

Und. At the auctioneer again. Zounds ! you are so fond of it, I dare say you would sell me.

Ros. Sir, I would knock you down with all the pleasure in life.

I'nd. But what of the key? the key-
Ros. The key certainly opened the drawer you men-

and it as certainly opened a drawer you did not mention.

Und. What?

Ros. Be quiet. There I found a parcel of papers and title-deeds, which you must have put there entirely by mistake, my dear sir, because I perceived they belonged to Mr. Egerton.

Und. Give them to me directly, directly-I say, sir, restore

Ros. Every thing to its right owner. Certainly-I don't wish to keep your, or any man's property -50, Egerton, there are your papers again-and, uncle, there is your key again.

Apr. Ha, ha!
Ege. What disinterested integrity!
Und. What damned rascality!
Ros. Oh fie! no, no.
Und. What is it, then ?
Ros. Management.

Und. Well, you have managed finely for yourself, however-I discard you. Had you followed my instructions, you would have been exalted

Ros. To the pillory, I suppose.—No, sir—though you don't scruple it to others, far be it from me to rob you of your natural inheritance.

Und. I would have left you all I am worth.

Ros. What then? You forgot all you are worth belongs to other people. When you were gone, they would naturally ask me for their own, and how could I have the face to refuse them ?

Apr. Give me your band. You have acted your part nobly, and now 'tis my turn.

Und. All this I laugh at. Am I not possessed of the Greville estate ? Who has any thing to say on that subject ?

Apr. I believe I shall trouble you with a word or two,

Und. I see Greville is about to depart, and I must beg you will all follow his example. Enter Mr. and Mrs. GREVILLE, R., Sally following, with

a small bundle, and weeping. Ege. (L. C.) My best friends, allow me to present to you a sister. By this gentleman's kindness, Maria, happiness again dawns upon us.

Apr. (c.) [Aside.] And I will make it blaze with me. ridian splendour.

Gre. (R. C.) Let us then leave this man to the full enjoyment of such reflections as his conscience may ad. minister.

Apr. I beg your pardon a moment. Umph! Mr. Undermine, I hear doubts have arisen respecting the authenticity of the late Mr. Greville's signature.

Und. (R.) [With a confident smile.] Indeed !-Sir, to show my fairness, I'll leave this point to your decision,

[Showing the will. Apr. 'Tis genuine, it must be confessed. Und. Must it so ? Apr. Any objection to my reading it? Und. None. Apr. Perhaps it may tire you?

Und. By no means : I think it remarkably entertaining.

Apr. [Substituting the second will, reads,] “I, Robert Greville, do declare this my last will.To my only son, Charles Greville, I give and bequeath my forgiveness and my blessing, together with all my estates, real and per. sonal.”- Umph! that is very entertaining.

Und. Very—but I prefer the remainder-“ Provided my said son"-go on-go on. Apr. Wbat do you say?

Und. Psha ! -“ Provided my said son has not contracted”-why don't you go on?

Apr. I don't see any thing like it.

Und. You don't, ha, ha! give me leave to direct your attention. [Looks at the will, drops his hat and cane, and groans

deeply. Gre. Wbat does this mean?

Apr. Mean !—That my young master, my friend, my dear Charles, is happy—that my old master is in heaven, and that I am in heaven; two wills were made : by the

last, which he endeavoured to suppress, you are sole heir, without reservation.

Mrs. G. Is it possible !

Gre. How shall I express my gratitude for this discovery ?-for giving happiness to my Maria?

Sal. And to me, too. Oh, you are a nice old man. Und. He must haye dealt with

Apr. Old Nick. You are right, I did—and here he comes.

Enter NICHOLAS, L.
Und. Ah, Nicholas, Nicholas !
Nic. Ah, master, master!
Und. A dreadful affair this !
Nic. Very shocking indeed, sir.

Und. Eh-zounds! I have given him a draft foi a thousand pounds. [Coaxingly.] Nicholas—[Crosses to middie.] Come here, Nicholas. I am not angry. My consolation is, what's done can't be undone. I gave you a draft

Nic. You did, sir. And my consolation is, what's done can't be undone.

Und. Indeed! but it will be of no use. 1 have no cash at my banker's.

Nic. Dear sir, what credit you have ! They paid it without a word.

Und. (Eagerly.) You have not been-
Nic. Yes, sir-I just contrived to hobble there.

Und. You infernal! [Gulping down his passion.] Old friends should not quarrel, Nicholas ; suppose we go home, and talk it over agreeably. I'll propose something reasonable.

Nic. It must be very reasonable.
Und. It shall. Gentlemen

[Bowing. Ros. (c.) What, bowing! You forget, sir, your own lessons.-Be erect, and I'll tell you how you may be so ; -become an honest man, and, on my life, that will make you hold up your head more gallantly than the first dancing-master in Europe can.

Und. Indeed !
Nic. You had better stick to management!
Und. Management !-Oh, I have had enough of that.

[Exeunt Undermine and Nicholas, L. Apr. Now, being all as happy as heart can wish, come along with me, Sally. Good by to you

Gre. Where are you going, April ?

Apr. To the kitchen. I have no notion of your houses, not I, where all the joy is confined to the drawing-room. Let there be degrees in every thing but happiness; and, 'fore George, if any servant in this house be sober enough to wait on you at supper, I'll discharge him to-morrow morning.–Poor fellows! must not make them ill, though. Never mind-come along, Sally.

[Crosses to Sully, R. Sal. Oh, you are a nice old man !

Ros. [To Egerton and Greville.] If I must have thanks, gentlemen, let me receive them here. (Kissing the ladies' hands.] Happy fellows! you are to be envied.

Mrs. G. So are you. We have received happiness : you have given it.

Rose. Your fortunes, sir, will be our peculiar care.

Ros. Thank you, dear ladies; but, with your permission, I'll stick to my trade.

And, oh! could all my pray’rs but gain this lot,
To raise my pulpit nightly on this spot,
Then your poor auctioneer would prize his station,
While you vouchsafed one nod of approbation.

DISPOSITION OF THE CHARACTERS AT THE

FALL OF THE CURTAIN.

SALLY. APRIL. Grev. MRS. G. Rost. Rose. Eger. R.)

[L.

THE END.

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