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OF

ELOCUTION

AND

ACTION

By F. TOWNSEND SOUTHWICK

Original Illustrations

THIRD EDITION-REVISED AND ENLARGED

NEW YORK
EDGAR S. WERNER
108 EAST 16TH STREET

1896

Copyright, 1890, 1894

BY

EDGAR S. WERNER

All Rights Reserved

646474

ERRATA.

Page 29, 14th line from bottom, for“come' read came.
Page 89, credit last poetic extract to Tennyson.
Page 107, credit poetic extract to Scott.
Page 123, make 8th line from bottom read: “Never harm, nor spell, nor

charm."
Page 131, 3rd line from bottom, for "expressions” read expression.
Page 152, 13th iine from top, for “ associate” read associates.
Page 168, 4th line from bottom, for “termagant” read Termagant.
Page 174, 2nd line from bottom, put a colon after “melody."
Page 176, 1st line from bottom, put a comma after "speaking."
Page 177, 4th line from top, for " studies" read study.
Page 177, 6th line from top, for “forescore” read fourscore.

TO

Austin B. Fletcher, A.M., LL.B.,

TO WHOM,

AS ARTIST, TEACHER, AND FRIEND, I OWE

MUCH MORE THAN THIS SIMPLE

TRIBUTE CAN REPAY.

PREFACE.

This little work is intended for beginners in expression. It gives, in as simple language as the writer can command, the elements of the art. The order in which the lessons are given is in accordance with the author's experience in teaching classes of the grade for which it is designed. Teachers of wider experience may find another arrangement preferable; if so, it is an easy matter to assign the lessons as they please. The difficulty has been to select only such exercises and rules as are absolutely essential for young students. It cannot be expected that all will agree with the author's judgment in this particular; nevertheless, the satisfactory results obtained by adhering strictly to the matter contained herein have convinced him that while much of importance might easily have been added, nothing that was absolutely necessary has been omitted. Suggestions looking toward improvement will, however, be thankfully received.

Toward the end, the lessons are more difficult and longer than in the beginning. Since the book was planned to cover at least a school-year of ordinary elocutionary training, the latter part, it is hoped, will be found to have but kept pace with the mental and artistic development of the pupil. The chapters on pantomimic expression may, however, be subdivided or reserved for a second year's course, if deemed advisable. Many pupils will, of course, go over the whole ground very quickly.

I do not advocate memorizing the lessons. The

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